The First Steps To Becoming A Foster Parent and Adopting from Foster Care

Become a Foster Parent and Adoptive Parent

When you realize that your heart has been stirred and it is no longer okay to sit by and do nothing…

You MUST take action!


The Foster Care System and countless children who are waiting for a family is nothing short of a tragedy. For years, my husband and I talked about becoming Foster Parents and Adopting and when we finally made the decision to start the process, we were at a loss of how and where to start. 

I have had quite a few questions on how did we become foster parents and start the adoptive process. While every state will look a little different, this is how we became took the first steps to becoming a Foster Parent and Adopting from Foster Care. Or as we called it… “Paper Pregnant.”

1. Consider Your Family 

Every family is different. It is important that you do a self evaluation of your family life before bringing in a child who has no family or is coming from a horrible family situation. Your marriage should be stable. Your children should be secure in your love. Make sure, above all, that you are all together with going forward with foster care and adoption. Too often, one family member gets pushed into opening up their home, and then they struggle with opening their hearts.

2. Join a Facebook Group for Foster/Adoptive Parents

There are so many support groups out there! Search Foster Care/Adoption with your state for groups on Facebook. There are also country expanding Facebook groups for all Foster Care/Adoption parents and groups that are specific for cultural or religion support as a Foster Parent/Adoptive Parent. These groups have been a HUGE blessing to me. They welcome any and all questions. They will answer your questions honestly from experience. I learned quite a bit just from reading the questions and even venting posts of others. 

The state specific groups are especially helpful for resources and information that is state specific in the Foster Care system.

Foster Care-4

3. Read Their Stories

Go to Adoptuskids.org and read the stories of the children waiting to find their forever family. Look at their faces. See the sibling groups who are desperate not to be split up. Read the honesty of the case worker who lists the special needs and struggles of the child as well as what makes them unique and desperate for a family. These are the children who you will be bringing into your home. They come from hard places. They have had trauma. They need love and stability. 

You can also find your state specific adoption listing to see children available in your home state.

4. Contact the Department of Human Services

Again each state has it’s own name for the department which child welfare falls under. You can usually find a link from your state’s website. There you will be able to find a listing of agencies or departments where you will be able to begin your licensing process.  

Many states have both private and government agencies to choose from. Talk with other foster parents in your area about the pros and cons of each agency in your area. (Facebook groups are the best for this)

5. Go to an Adoption Party

Our state regularly hosts adoption parties. Those who are interested in adoption can come to a neutral place (such as a museum or bowling alley) and meet and interact with children who are available for adoption. This is a no-pressure situation. You are able to talk with the kids and get to know them while engaging in an activity. If one of those children grab your hearts at the party you can speak with the adoption worker about getting to know that child even more and beginning the adoption process. 

6. Go to a Foster Care & Adoption Orientation

The BEST thing that Jon and I did was go to an Orientation. It costs nothing but a little of your time to go to an Orientation class. It gave us a LOT of information! We found out what to expect during the licensing process. We learned what home and financial requirements were needed. And we also realized that some of our expectations and preconceived notions were way off. It was a good dose of reality. During and after orientation we were able to ask questions we had. We also signed up for our mandatory foster care and adoption classes that day and began signing the HUGE pile of paperwork we would need to complete.

Most orientations and classes repeat every month or every other month.

7. Realize the Facts

  • The Licensing process takes an average 6 months. (this isn’t an overnight process)
  • You will have people dig into your lives and ask a LOT of questions, come into your home, and pry into your background.
  • The children you are welcoming into your home need a lot of love. They also may need therapy, extra attention, have behavioral problems, and may push you away. They have experienced a lot of trauma. And they are CHILDREN. (I know a lot of adults who don’t know how to handle trauma. These poor babies have no idea what to do to express their pain at times.)
  • You may feel lonely during this process. Family and friends may not completely understand what you are going through or why you decided to go through it. Everyone gets excited at the birth of a baby, but bringing home a 6 year old… there may not be a baby shower or welcome party. 
  • It is the most difficult and amazing journey you will ever begin. I won’t lie. The process was a little intimidating and at times felt frustrating, but it was worth it! Oh, so worth it!

I hope that helps you as you begin the process of Foster Care and Adoption. You can do this! Those sweet children need you! Keep looking for the next step and the answers to your questions. 

If you aren’t ready to adopt or foster, support someone who is on the journey!!!

Ways to support a Foster parent or adoptive parent

They need your support and you will learn a lot from loving on them and the children they are opening their hearts to.

Happy Adoption Process!
Keikilani

Don’t forget to DOWNLOAD your FREE Foster Care & Adoption Resource Collection by Subscribing HERE!!!!

20 thoughts on “The First Steps To Becoming A Foster Parent and Adopting from Foster Care

  • January 6, 2016 at 10:47 am
    Permalink

    This is so awesome. I have so much admiration for parents who foster kids. I know it’s not easy to do, but its such an amazing gift.

    Reply
  • January 6, 2016 at 2:01 pm
    Permalink

    Kudos to anyone who takes this on. We have some neighbors who are wonderful foster parents taking in kids removed from the homes of abusive or negligent birth parents. There are so many children who need placements right now and not enough quality foster homes to host them.

    Reply
  • January 6, 2016 at 2:23 pm
    Permalink

    So many issues to consider. Such an amazing thing gift to give, and receive.

    Reply
  • January 6, 2016 at 3:41 pm
    Permalink

    Interesting post. It’s great that you do this – one of my cousins is adopted, my uncle flew to Brazil to adopt him.

    Reply
  • January 6, 2016 at 4:44 pm
    Permalink

    Foster Parents are indeed special people. This is good initial information for people considering. It seems like such an overwhelming process, but when it’s broken down like this, it makes it much more understandable and seem less unattainable.

    Reply
  • January 6, 2016 at 5:25 pm
    Permalink

    We’ve discussed fostering in the past. We’d love to do it although our home is not quite big enough for another child at this time.

    Reply
  • January 6, 2016 at 6:20 pm
    Permalink

    So have you adopted or are you fostering children? Thanks for the info…it’s been on my mind before 🙂

    Reply
  • January 6, 2016 at 7:42 pm
    Permalink

    This is great information, and people need to really understand what’s involved. I admire anyone who can help children feel loved and wanted, and give them a happy and safe home.

    Reply
  • January 6, 2016 at 8:50 pm
    Permalink

    I would consider adopting a child someday, so this was very interesting and informative. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  • January 7, 2016 at 12:11 am
    Permalink

    What great advice. I have a good friend who is just submitted all her papers and went through the classes to foster.

    Reply
  • January 7, 2016 at 1:54 am
    Permalink

    This is really helpful. It sounds like it can be a challenging road but definitely worth it!

    Reply
  • January 7, 2016 at 4:30 am
    Permalink

    I have a friend in California who fosters kids and she is such a loving person. This is a great post and very good tips for those who want to foster.

    Reply
  • January 7, 2016 at 5:45 am
    Permalink

    A friend of mine recently adopted a tiny baby boy and although the experience has been joyous it has been very tough on her family to adjust.

    Reply
  • January 7, 2016 at 10:11 am
    Permalink

    I think it’s wonderful when people reach out to others, especially children Kudos to those who take those steps!

    Reply
  • January 7, 2016 at 12:40 pm
    Permalink

    I would love to adopt a child. But, I know it wouldn’t be good on everyone else. Adoption is a beautiful thing!

    Reply
  • January 8, 2016 at 5:24 am
    Permalink

    Thanks for all the information in this post. I too had wondered about foster care. A lot of my questions were answered here. Thank you

    Reply
  • July 6, 2016 at 11:24 pm
    Permalink

    6 months feels like two lifetimes at the age of 44 and childless! Ugh!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *